Bringing Temporary Protected Status to an End

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For the past three decades, thousands of immigrants from Nicaragua have been making their way to the United States. In these years, some have been granted the permission to live in the United States under special circumstances. However, this looks set to change after the Trump administration announced that it would end their stay in the country. A report released by the Department of Homeland Security revealed that these immigrants would not be evicted immediately. Their departure date has been postponed up to 5th January 2019. This time frame gives the immigrants that are estimated to be around 2,500 time to leave the country. This timeframe is also meant for these people to adjust their immigration status where necessary. They have been enjoying the stay in America under the Temporary Protected Status that was passed into law in 1990. For starters, this is a law that is meant to protect foreigners entering the United States of America. Most of the targeted people are from Central America particularly those that are running away from natural disasters and war. The program further allowed the inclusion of Haiti citizens in 2010. According to the statement, the current secretary of homeland security was still contemplating on what to do with the citizens of Honduras, El Salvador, and Haiti who enjoy the act protection. The current acting homeland security secretary is Elaine Duke.

The department of homeland had been given up to Monday to find a solution for the situation. They had two options that included terminating the program or renewing the program. The secretary said that she didn’t have enough information regarding Honduran citizens and could not decide at the moment. She said that the temporary protective status for the Honduran people would be extended for six months. The Trump administration has argued that these people have been in America for over 10 years. At the same time, the living conditions in their home countries had improved meaning that they could return. The administration further argues that these people are responsible for taking jobs that are meant for Americans. Together with allied lawmakers such as Iowa Republican Senator Charles E. Grassley, they argue that these people continue to enjoy benefits that are meant for the American people. At the moment, this program protects over 300,000 people from deportation. These are people who have embarked on brighter careers and have even bought homes in the country. Some have even given birth to children who are American citizens.

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